jump to navigation

Escape from North Korea January 16, 2007

Posted by David in North-East Asia.
trackback

The DPRKs ongoing antics are allegedly aimed at ensuring against an attack from the US, but I highly doubt it. In fact, it is more likely that North Koreas leaders have no clue on how to navigate their country in todays world. As a matter of fact, they havent had a clue since the Korean War ended.

Its sad when you think about the average North Koreans situation. No food, no electricity, no freedom, no life (at least not from a Westerners point-of-view). They are oppressed, abused, and taken for granted, and nothing theGreat Leader does serves to benefit the people.

During the 1970s and 1980s the North began kidnapping South Koreans, Japanese, and other foreigners, in an attempt to learn about life in these other countries, in an effort to create a spy network.

Im not sure they ever got anything worthtwhile out of this endeavour, but I am positive those abducted had and are having a hell-of-a-time, living under that regime. Thats why its nice to hear stories about those that do make it out, alive.

The latest to do so, according to several media outlets is a South Korean fisherman who escaped North Korea to China after 31 years of captivity. The Korea Herald today, wrote thatChoi Uk-il, 67, arrived at Incheon International Airport in the afternoon and reunited with his wife Yang Young-ja, 66, and family members.

They go on to write,Choi was one of 33 fishermen kidnapped in 1975 while fishing in the East Sea. He escaped the North at the end of last year and had stayed in a hideaway in Yenji, northeastern China.

A similar BBC News story noted thatSouth Korea believes 485 of its citizens have been kidnapped by the North since the Korean War ended in a ceasefire, not a peace treaty, in 1953. Of course, the North denies all of this and claims they want to be there. Yeah right!

Considering that theabductee issue is a big thing in Japan (DPRK kidnapped Japanese people in the 70s and 80s), maybe both South Korea and Japan should work together at finding all of their citizens.

The results may be more positive for the families of the victims.

Advertisements

Comments»

No comments yet — be the first.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: